Friday, May 26, 2017

Off-Hill Supervisors Honored at Appreciation Dinner

by Phillip J. Shifflet

On Tuesday, April 25th, Mount Angel Seminary hosted its annual Appreciation Dinner. This dinner is meant to honor and express our thanksgiving toward the pastoral ministry supervisors, the pastoral intern supervisors, and the seminarians’ spiritual directors.

Each year, seminarians are assigned a field education placement, and once a week they go off-hill for various ministries. Food banks, RCIA programs, parish youth groups, prisons, and homes for the elderly are among the many opportunities that seminarians have to serve the wider community.
MAS Polyphony, an a capella group consisting of second-year theologians from five different dioceses, performed a rendition of Ubi Caritas, featuring Myrna Keough, the seminary’s Coordinator of Music and Liturgy. Viane Ilimaleota, a seminarian from the Diocese of Samoa-Pago Pago, also sang two songs accompanied by a guitar.

This year’s dinner was coordinated by seminarians John Mosier (Diocese of Boise) and Ethan Alano (Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon). Mosier prepared a short video presentation highlighting some of the school year’s major events and photographs of seminarians doing ministry.

Established in 1889, Mount Angel Seminary is the largest seminary in the western United States, forming men for the Catholic priesthood. Founded by the monks of Mount Angel Abbey, the seminary serves both graduate and undergraduate seminarians from the western United States, Canada, the Pacific Islands, and as far away as Hungary, as well as seminarians from various religious communities and many lay students.

Monday, May 22, 2017

Seminarians and Faculty Honored at Annunciation Dinner

Story by Phillip J. Shifflet

On Tuesday, March 21st, students, faculty, staff, and guests of Mount Angel Seminary gathered in the Aquinas Dining Hall to celebrate the annual Annunciation Dinner. At the dinner, guests shared fellowship and honored particular members of the community for their contributions and achievements. The awards and their winners are listed below.

The Saint Benedict Award for outstanding progress in both graduate and undergraduate human formation was presented to graduate student Deacon Nathan McWeeney (Theology 4) of the Diocese of San Diego, and undergraduate student Dustin Busse (College 4) of the Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon. The award is given to those seminarians who best exemplify the highest formational ideals of the seminary, who model the Benedictine charism, who live the values of the Kingdom and actively proclaim the Good News, who love the Church, and who manifest servant-leadership in the seminary community.

Deacon Chad Green (Theology 4) from the Archdiocese of Seattle was presented the Saint Michael the Archangel Award for his special contributions to the seminary and its programs. This award is given to a student who has contributed significantly to the life of the seminary by establishing something new and beneficial or, through exceptional fidelity, commitment, creativity, and good will, has furthered something already established.



The St. Anselm Award was presented to John DePalma (Pre-Theology 1) of the Archdiocese of Seattle, in recognition of that philosophy student whose love of learning, excellent academic record, appreciation of philosophy and the liberal arts, rigorous self-discipline, active classroom participation, and outstanding leadership ability have gained him the respect of the faculty and the admiration of his peers.



The Saint Thomas Aquinas Award for outstanding academic achievement from a theology student was presented to Deacon Joseph Walsh (Theology 4) of the Diocese of Reno. This award is given in recognition of that student whose love of learning, excellent academic record, outstanding ability to articulate Catholic theology, rigorous scholarly research, active classroom participation, generosity with time and talent, and strong leadership ability have won the respect of the faculty and the admiration of students.

Deacon Andrés Emmanuelli Peréz (Theology 4) of the Diocese of Sacramento received the Saint Paul Award for outstanding progress in developing preaching skills. The award is based on the ability to proclaim the Word of God, call to conversion those who hear the Word, and the ability to possess a comfortable presence at the ambo.

The Saint Bonaventure Award for outstanding contribution from a faculty member was presented to Dr. Shawn Keough, associate professor of theology and Church history at the seminary. The award is based on the ability to teach effectively and generosity with time and talent which have inspired students and won the praise of colleagues. This is the second time that Dr. Keough has won this award since joining the faculty; he also received this award in 2013.

Deacon Zani Pacanza (Theology 4) of the Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon received the Bishop Connolly Prize for his essay entitled “The Two Facets of Christ through the Eyes of John.” Given in honor of the Most Reverend Thomas Connolly (d. 2015), former bishop of the Diocese of Baker, this prize is awarded to a seminarian whose submitted project best represents the theme of the theological symposium. Most recently, the topic of the theological symposium was “Issues in Christology,” and was given by noted theologian Rev. Thomas Weinandy, OFMCap.

Mount Angel Seminary began forming men for the priesthood in 1889 and is now the oldest and largest seminary in the western United States, and the only seminary in the West that offers both a college and a graduate school of theology.  Since its inception 128 years ago, MAS has educated and formed thousands of priests, and many qualified religious and lay men and women as well, for service to the people of God in nearly 100 dioceses and religious communities across the country and around the world.

Monday, May 1, 2017

CRS Offers Short Talk on Water

by Hilda Kleiman

On Tuesday, April 18, the seminary community received a lunch-hour talk by Mr. Paul Hicks, the Senior Technical Advisor for Water Resources at Catholic Relief Services.  He has worked for Catholic Relief Services for 18 years and was able to come to Mount Angel Seminary on his way to a specialty coffee conference in Seattle.

Mr. Hicks titled his talk "Integral Ecology: The Confessions of a Catholic Development Worker."  In his talk he spoke on how he has been inspired by Pope Francis and his encyclical Laudato Si and shared three lessons he has learned as a development worker.

Lesson #1 - He and agencies such as CRS cannot solve other peoples problems for them.  Hicks described CRS as a relationship agency that may assist communities with developing the relationships within their own communities that will enable them to address their own problems.

Lesson #2 - He has learned to embrace conflict, to understand that the way toward a better situation is often by working through conflict rather than avoiding it.

Lesson #3 - Development work is inherently political and includes advocacy, particular concerning the common good and natural resources.